Thursday, August 24, 2017
The-Diector-MEAs-Mr.-Richard-Mwendandu-with-the-Biodiversity-focal-point-officer-in-the-Ministry-Mr.-Parkinson-Ndonye-during-the-just-ended-COP-13-in-Cancun-Mexico

The-Diector-MEAs-Mr.-Richard-Mwendandu-with-the-Biodiversity-focal-point-officer-in-the-Ministry-Mr.-Parkinson-Ndonye-during-the-just-ended-COP-13-in-Cancun-Mexico

Kenya, which is one of the 196 parties which constitute the Conference of the Parties {CBD/COP}, put a spirited effort during the 13th Conference on Biological Diversity (COP 13), that was held at the Mexican City of Cancun, Mexico, from December 4th to 17th, through pushing the Country’s agenda on Biodiversity and climate change, with the Principal Secretary in the State Department of Environment, Mr. Charles Sunkuli, representing the Cabinet Secretary during the High Level Segment, a session for Heads of Governments and Minister’s, that provide political guidance and sets the tempo for the agenda items and negotiations.

Biodiversity, which comprises much of the renewable natural capital on which livelihoods and development are grounded, forms the foundation of life on earth, but it is disappearing in the face of human activity due to pressures driven by a range of socio-economic drivers, and policies relating to issues such as land degradation and desertification, trade, transport, development, climate change, security, health care and education, all have impacts on biodiversity.

In response to these concerns, governments, Kenya included, negotiated the Convention on Biological Diversity {CBD}, to promote sustainable development, thereby, reducing biodiversity loss. The CBD is one of the three RIO Conventions together with Climate Change and Desertification, that entered into force on December, 29th 1993.

The main objective of the Convention on Biological Diversity   are:-conservation of biological diversity, the sustainable use of components, and the fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising out of their utilization,

The Kenyan delegation at COP 13 showcased the Country’s implementation plan of the Nagoya Protocol on access and benefit sharing, in an event at the sidelines of the Conference, that was officiated by the Director, Multilateral Environmental Agreements, Mr. Richard Mwendandu on behalf of the Cabinet Secretary; the delegation, also ensured the Country was represented in all the contact groups that were addressing key agenda items under the CBD, and participated at the Global Legislative Forum on Disaster Risk Reduction and Biodiversity, that was moderated by Kenya’s nominated Senator, Hon. Zipporah Kittony,

Among the key agenda items that the Kenyan delegation participated in various contact groups included:- resource and financial mechanisms; public awareness, education and participation; resource mobilization; compliance; synergies; multilateral benefits-sharing mechanisms, global/Nagoya protocol and risk assessment, among others.

Kenya, was also awarded with a Bronze Medal at the Conference, for its success in implementing the Clearing House Mechanism {CHM}, an information exchange sharing platform of the CBD, that is domiciled at the National Environment Management Authority {NEMA}.

The Country’s delegation at the Conference was led by the Principal Secretary, State Department of Environment, Mr. Charles Sunkuli, and included the Director of Multilateral Environmental Agreements in the Ministry, Mr. Richard Mwendandu and the Biodiversity focal point officer in the Ministry, Mr. Parkinson Ndonye, among others.

The 14th Conference on Biological Diversity, {COP 14), is set to be hosted by the Arab Republic of Egypt in 2018.

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Dr. Pacifica Achieng,Director Climate Change Programmes Coordination, (left) listens to a participant stressing a point during the Climate Change Workshop held in Nakuru. Looking on is Margaret Kamau.

Dr. Pacifica Achieng,Director Climate Change Programmes Coordination, (left) listens to a participant stressing a point during the Climate Change Workshop held in Nakuru. Looking on is Margaret Kamau.

Climate Change is an international issue that affects all sectors of the economy. It is here with us and everyone is affected. We need to deal with it by developing innovative interventions. Everyone has a role to play in a different way to make a difference.

Kenya is among the first countries in the world to enact a climate change law and this demonstrates the country’s commitment on matters of climate change.

The Directorate of Climate Change Programmes Coordination held a three days stakeholders’ workshop in Nakuru to raise awareness on the Climate Change Act, 2016 and develop innovative ways of implementing it.

Addressing participants, the Director of Programmes Coordination, Dr. Pacifica Achieng noted that different sectors were at different levels of implementing the Act and intimated that at the end of the workshop, a unified and inclusive process will be charted to drive the process forward.

It was emphasized that all state departments establish focal climate change desks to institutionalize and mainstream climate change issues in all their respective programmes. Each entity will also be required to submit an annual report on mitigation and adaptative measures taken in their respective sectors. Participants also proposed that climate change studies be streamlined into the education curriculum and teacher education curriculum as an entry point to ensure all actors work towards the same goal of mainstreaming climate change in all sectors.

A draft National Climate Change Action Plan (NCCAP) Tracking Tool and Climate Change Action Registry for mitigation and adaptive strategies was developed to be validated by March, 2017.

Participants were informed that to reduce the effects of climate change, adjustments have to be made to ensure that adaptative capacity is in place so that systems upgrade themselves without going into an emergency mode.

Dr. John Chumo, who represented the Council of Governors, reiterated the Counties’ support for implementation of the Climate Change Act, 2016. He cautioned against duplications between programmes undertaken by the National Government and the County Governments and called on the various sectors to consult with respective County Governments before starting any new programmes to avoid rejection by local communities.

The Directorate has previously held sector meetings with the national government, county governments, private sector, civil society and marginalized groups to sensitize them on climate change issues.

The workshop brought together stakeholders from various sectors to increase their level of understanding of the Climate Change Act, 2016 and agree on sectoral coordination mechanisms.  This is the first among a series of meetings to be held with stakeholders. It was supported by UKaid, UNDP and USAID.

 

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14.12.2016

 

Principal Secretary for Environment Charles Sunkuli with his counterpart from Lands and Physical Planning Mariamu El Maawy, listen keenly to discussions on Sutainable Land Management during a breakfast meeting held in Nairobi

Principal Secretary for Environment Charles Sunkuli with his counterpart from Lands and Physical Planning Mariamu El Maawy, listen keenly to discussions on Sutainable Land Management during a breakfast meeting held in Nairobi

A Framework to guide the government in addressing land management issues in a sustainable manner across all sectors has been developed.

The Kenya Strategic Investment Framework (KSIF) for Sustainable Land Management (SLM) is a tool that has identified hotspots, policy gaps and investment priorities for scaling up sustainable land management. It has also outlined clear roles for key sectors and stakeholders to guide and focus interventions which will curb land degradation and its effects in various parts of the country.

The PS for Environment, Charles Sunkuli led discussions with stakeholders to enrich the proposed KSIF for SLM in Kenya and deliberate on the proposed coordination mechanism. Stakeholders also discussed the most appropriate ways to operationalize the framework and mainstream the same across sectors.

SLM has in recent years been a focus of the Government and numerous development partners, due to its potential to minimize degradation, rehabilitate degraded lands and increase food production.

Land degradation is increasing in severity and extent in many areas of the country, which also happen to be the most productive.

The State Department of Environment through the KAPSLMP project component is currently fine tuning the KSIF.

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The Cabinet Secretary for Environment Prof. Judi Wakhungu has decried the poor solid waste management within the urban settlements in the country that has become a menace.

To address the hazard, Prof. Wakhungu urged county governments to set aside sufficient land for construction of sanitary landfills alongside promoting resource-use practices that minimize generation of waste.

Owing to the magnitude of managing solid waste and enforcement of regulations, the CS called for strong partnerships between different law      enforcing agencies, the public and the private sector.

She made the remarks in a speech read on her behalf by the Environment Secretary Dr. Alice Kaudia, during a 3 day youth Stakeholders Conference at Moi high School Kabarak drawn from various counties to find solutions to environmental challenges.

The conference whose theme was  “Building synergies towards environmental sustainability’’  focused on three thematic areas with challenges posed by climate change, food and nutrition insecurity  as well as  solid waste management.

Prof Wakhungu challenged the youth to initiate innovative enterprises and business ideas that would create employment while at the same time support efforts towards addressing challenges of climate change and enable the country transition to a green growth economy.

 

 

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The Kenyan delegation at the COP13 in Cancun, Mexico

The Kenyan delegation at the COP13 in Cancun, Mexico

The 13th Meeting of the Conference of Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD/COP13) is taking place from 4-17 December 2015 in Cancun, Mexico. Biodiversity is critical to achieving the sustainable Development Goals.

It lies at the center of many economic activities, including those related to agriculture, forestry, fisheries and tourism. Many of the most vulnerable people depend directly on biodiversity to fulfill their daily sustenance needs, leaving them particularly at risk to environmental degradations.

Biodiversity forms the foundation of life on earth but it is disappearing in the face of human activity. Biodiversity comprises much of the renewable natural capital on which livelihoods and development are grounded.

Policies relating to issues such as land degradation and desertification, trade, transport, development, climate change, security, health care and education, all have impacts on biodiversity. The losses are due to a range of pressures driven by a range of socio-economic drivers.

img_3785The response to these concerns are that the Governments negotiated the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) to promote sustainable development thereby reducing biodiversity loss.

The CBD is therefore one of the three Rio Conventions (together with climate change and desertification conventions). It entered into force on 29th December 1993 and it has 196 Parties which constitute the Conference of the Parties (CBD/COP).

The main objectives of CBD are; conservation of biological diversity, the sustainable use of its components and the fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising out of the utilization.

Consideration of biodiversity and ecosystem health will be essential in (CBD/COP13), as countries embark on the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and it’s SDGs and implementation of key National priorities for sustainable development.

Listening carefully at presentations on financial mechanisms at COP13- in Cancun, Mexico 2016

Listening carefully at presentations on financial mechanisms at COP13- in Cancun, Mexico 2016

The Venue of COP14 will be decided at CBD/COP13, in Mexico. It is hoped that Egypt’s offer to host COP14 in 2018 in Sharm El- Sheikh will be supported by all parties.

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 Kenya's Joe Masinde from NEMA, receiving the Bronze Award on behalf of the country during the on-going COP 13 in Cancun, Mexico

Kenya’s Joe Masinde from NEMA, receiving the
Bronze Award on behalf of the country during the
on-going COP 13 in Cancun, Mexico

Kenya has won a bronze medal for its outstanding provision of information regarding the biological diversity to world.

The country received the award during the ongoing Conference of Parties (COP 13) in Cancun, Mexico in the category of establishment and development of National Clearing-House Mechanism (CHM).

Nations that are parties to the conference strive to provide effective information services in a bid to promote scientific and technical cooperation on the Biological Diversity under the clearing house Mechanism.

The National Environment Management Authority (NEMA) which is the designated National CHM strategic leader, operates a national Multilateral Environment Agreement’ s (MEAS) portal on its website, providing information, status and trends of  biodiversity in Kenya. It lists various Ministries and semi autonomous government agencies and stakeholders that are partners in the program.

A section of the Kenyan delegation to COP 13 in Mexico join in celebrating the award

A section of the Kenyan delegation to COP 13 in Mexico join in celebrating the award

The highly regarded Global Award was presented at a ceremony held on the margins of the Conference of Parties (COP 13) on the Convention of Biological Diversity in Cancun, Mexico. It was received on behalf of the Republic of Kenya by Mr. Joseph Masinde, an Environmental Education and Information Officer   from NEMA.

The award was granted through a certificate signed by the executive secretary of the Conference on Biodiversity (CBD), Dr. Braulio F de Souza Dias.

The CHM further examines whether countries are transparent in knowledge sharing and Information exchange that assists in decision making in order to establish a fully operational network of parties and partners to the CBD.

Network development, information exchange, co-operation, Transparency, and the availability of national, regional, and local data are some of its key elements.

Kenya's Joe Masinde(second right) with other global achievers after receiving the Bronze Award in Cancun, Mexico.

Kenya’s Joe Masinde(second right) with other global achievers after
receiving the Bronze Award in Cancun, Mexico.

NEMA established her National CHM website in 2015 with the support from the Global Environment Facility (GEF), through the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Medium-size Project under GEF-4.

The project was for the development of a National Multilateral Environmental Agreements portal, to provide all stakeholders involved in environmental conservation, with a platform on which information on Biodiversity and Climate Change would be posted.

The other achievers who were granted CHM Awards at COP 13 were:

Existing National CHM Category /Parties that already had established their national CHM by COP 12

  1. Gold Award – Mexico
  2. Silver Award – Australia
  3. Bronze Award – Belgium

New National CHM Category/ Parties that have established their national CHM after COP 12, and prior to COP 13

  1. Gold Award – Malaysia
  2. Silver Award – Guatemala
  3. Bronze Award – Kenya

Certificates of Achievement at COP 13

A Certificate of Achievement was delivered to the following Parties at COP 13:
Existing National CHM Category/ Parties that already had established their national CHM by COP 12

  • Burundi
  • Ethiopia
  • France
  • Jamaica
  • Madagascar
  • Morocco
  • Togo

New National CHM Category /Parties that have established their national CHM after COP 12, and prior to COP 13

  • Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Dominican Republic
  • Iraq
  • Nigeria
  • Seychelles
  • Sudan
  • Uruguay

 

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PS Sunkuli leads Ministry and The Nature Conservancy officials in displaying the signed MOU

PS Sunkuli leads Ministry and The Nature Conservancy officials in displaying the signed MOU

The Ministry of Environment and Natural resources is partnering with The Nature Conservancy to manage the Upper Tana Nairobi Water Fund that supports upstream water and soil conservation for improved water quality and supply.

The principal Secretary for Environment Mr. Charles Sunkuli yesterday signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with officials of The Nature Kenya Conservancy to take over the fund that was operated by Kenya Agricultural productivity and sustainable land management (KAPSLM).

The MOU will provide a framework for cooperation and coordination between the Ministry and The Nature Conservation which will promote and maintain Sustainable Land Management through implementation of the payment of Ecosystems (PES) Scheme in the Sasumua Watershed. The Nature Conservancy Kenya program director Munira Bashir signed the MOU on behalf of the organization.

The water Fund provides thousands of farmers in the Sasumua watershed with positive benefits for protecting and conserving the ecosystem that ensures over 90 % of steady water supply to Nairobi and its environs.

The new partnership will allow full roll out of environmental conservation support to all the farms in the 8 micro catchments of Upper Tana Nairobi Water Fund.

Present during the signing was the Director of programs, Projects and Strategic Initiatives Mrs. Agnes Yobterick and KAPSLM component Manager Mr.   Malik Aman.

Environment PS Mr. Charles Sunkuli welcomes Munira Bashi of The Nature Conservancy to sign an MOU for management of the Upper Tana Nairobi Water Fund

Environment PS Mr. Charles Sunkuli welcomes Munira Bashi of The Nature Conservancy to sign an MOU for management of the Upper Tana Nairobi Water Fund

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img_3775The review and progress towards the implementation of the strategic plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 and the achievement of the Aichi Biodiversity Targets and related means of implementations, has been ratified by the Kenyan protocol for full implementation. This was reported by Kenya during the intervention on the Strategic plan for Biodiversity position, while at CBD/COP13, in Cancun, Mexico.

Kenya has however taken note of the analysis of the progress towards the implementation of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 and the achievement of the Aichi Biodiversity Targets based on the information provided in the revised and updated National biodiversity Strategies and action plans and the fifth national reports.

Kenya has reported that it has finalized it’s 5th National Report to the convention on Biological Diversity CBD and that is one of the ways of meeting her obligations. The finalized report provides an overview of activities on biodiversity strategic plan (2011-2020) and Aichi Biodiversity targets which were adopted during COP10.

Upon realizing that target 17 was not realized by 2015 as envisaged, Kenya is committed to finalize its NBSAP to meet the said target. Kenya will therefore continue to review and enact statues and regulations and take up necessary measures to ensure that ecosystems are restored and maintained for sustenance ecosystem services.

On realizing that target 10 was also not realized by 2015, a number of actions have been put in place to meet the target. The actions include adaptation of the following statutes;

  • Climate change action plan
  • Climate change act
  • Intercoastal Zone management Action plan
  • Intercoastal management policy
  • Ocean and fisheries policy

The above facts marks the commitment for Kenya in maintaining the integrity of its catchment areas and other important ecosystems for continued provision of Ecosystem goals and services.

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Environment-PS-Sunkuli-ephasises-a-point-when-he-opened-the-Kenya-Air-Quality-Annual-Conference-at-ICRAF.jpg

Environment-PS-Sunkuli-ephasises-a-point-when-he-opened-the-Kenya-Air-Quality-Annual-Conference-at-ICRAF.jpg

Environment Principal Secretary Mr. Charles Sunkuli has called upon research institutions to share their findings with the public in order to facilitate informed decisions.

The PS noted that crucial scientific information regarding air quality in Kenya had been recorded but little action was being taken on it because the public had not been fully sensitized about it.

Mr. Sunkuli added that researchers had a moral obligation to disseminate scientific information and also engage the government in an effort to stem the runaway deaths caused by poor air quality.

He said research had confirmed air pollution was a serious problem that had caused respiratory disease causing 40 % of deaths globally with pneumonia killing 14,300 people annually. “Had people been aware of the dangers posed by the pollution, they would have taken precautionary measures” he added.

Mr. Sunkuli was speaking when he opened the annual Kenya Air Quality Conference at the International Centre for Research on Agro Forestry (ICRAF) headquarters at Gigiri, Nairobi.

The government was aspiring to create a healthy environment for its citizens as envisaged in the sustainable development goals and had already taken the lead in building capacity for its regulatory Institutions he noted.

The PS said the government would strengthen the regulatory institutions; National Environment Management Authority (NEMA) and Kenya Bureau of Standards (KEBS) through additional funding and training to enable them take appropriate measures on the serious polluters in the country.

He said the cabinet had already taken a decision to empower NEMA to take action on polluters including imposing hefty fines. This he noted would have far reaching effects on the country’s environment.

Mr. Sunkuli emphasized on the collaboration between the National Government and the County Governments through improving the regulatory framework to improve air quality in the country which was a devolved function as provided by the country’s constitution.

Dr. Andrianna Mbandi a researcher at Stockholm Environment Institute told the conference that studies done through   urban air quality in Africa program indicated that public transport in Nairobi was one of the highest causes of pollution owing to the exponential growth of motorbikes and private vehicles in the last 10 years.

The study recommended that governments develop a central database for air pollution research alongside establishing more air pollution monitoring stations.

PS-Sunkuli-middle-poses-for-a-group-photo-with-conference-participants.jpg

PS-Sunkuli-middle-poses-for-a-group-photo-with-conference-participants.jpg

 

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 PS, State Department o Environment, Mr. Charles Sunkuli, who is heading the Kenyan delegation to COP 13 in Cancun, Mexico, following the HLS proceedings at the Moon Palace Convention center.

PS, State Department o Environment, Mr. Charles Sunkuli, who is heading the Kenyan delegation to COP 13 in Cancun, Mexico, following the HLS proceedings at the Moon Palace Convention center.

The high-level segment for political leadership in the ongoing Biological Diversity Conference of Parties, met in Cancun, Mexico on December 2nd and 3rd 2016.

Mr. Charles Sunkuli the Principal Secretary for Environment who led the Kenyan delegation to the conference, stated that it was essential for human beings to live in harmony with Mother Nature as a fundamental condition for well-being of all life.

The high-level segment attended by 196 World leaders   was an opportunity for Heads of Governments and Ministers to provide political leadership to the largely scientific forum.

The PS  noted that continuity of live depended on conservation and sustainable use of diversity and its underpinned ecosystems.

The leaders expressed concern over the negative impacts on biodiversity caused by widespread degradation and fragmentation of ecosystems. These included unsustainable land use changes, overexploitation of natural resources, illegal harvesting and trade of species, introduction of invasive alien species, pollution of air, soil, inland waters and oceans, climate change and desertification.

The leaders noted that it was necessary to change human development patterns, behavior and activities to respect nature, in a bid to conserve biodiversity.

This they observed was in line with the 2020 Agenda for Sustainable Development whose goals was a strong reflection of conservation and provided new opportunities to address emerging challenges.

The leaders committed to work at all levels within their governments and across all sectors to mainstream biodiversity and establish effective institutional, legislative and regulatory frameworks tailored to their national needs.

To achieve their goals the leaders agreed to incorporate an all-inclusive economic, social, and cultural approach that would include respect for nature and human rights.

Noting that, Biodiversity offers solutions to the pressing development and societal challenges that the world community is currently facing, the leaders said they were most concerned by the negative impacts on biodiversity caused degradation and fragmentation of ecosystems, unsustainable land use changes, overexploitation of natural resources, illegal harvesting and trade of species, introduction of invasive alien species, pollution of air, soil, inland waters and oceans, climate change and desertification

The High Level Segment (HLS) of the 13th Conference of the Convention on Biological Diversity, that presents opportunities to Heads of Governments and Ministers to provide political leadership, met in the city of Cancun, Mexico, on 2 and 3 December 2016,

In their meeting, the leaders from 196 countries of the World , among them Kenya’s Principal Secretary in the State Department of Environment, Mr. Charles Sunkuli, who led the Kenyan delegation declared that, It was essential to live in harmony with nature and mother earth, as a fundamental condition for the well-being of all life, which depends on the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity, and the ecosystem services it underpins. Noting that, Biodiversity offers solutions to the pressing development and societal challenges that the world community is currently facing, the leaders said they were most concerned by the negative impacts on biodiversity caused by degradation and fragmentation of ecosystems, unsustainable land use changes, overexploitation of natural resources, illegal harvesting and trade of species, introduction of invasive alien species, pollution of air, soil, inland waters and oceans, climate change and desertification.

Noting that it was necessary to change human development patterns, behaviors, and activities to respect nature, they observed that, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its Sustainable Development Goals, which strongly reflects biodiversity, provides new opportunities to address development challenges in a transformative manner and with a perspective that integrates environmental, economic and social dimensions, the leaders committed to work at all levels within their governments and across all sectors to mainstream biodiversity, to work at all levels within their governments and across all sectors to mainstream biodiversity, establishing effective institutional, legislative and regulatory frameworks, tailored to national needs and circumstances, and incorporating an inclusive economic, social, and cultural approach with full respect for nature and human rights, through the following actions.

A-cross-section-of-the-Kenyan-delegation-to-COP-3-in-Cancun-Mexico-outside-the-Moon-Palace-Convention-center-venue-for-COP-13-meeting

A-cross-section-of-the-Kenyan-delegation-to-COP-3-in-Cancun-Mexico-outside-the-Moon-Palace-Convention-center-venue-for-COP-13-meeting

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5.12.2016.

The Director, MEAs, Mr. Richard Mwendandu during the COP 13 on CBD in Cancun, Mexico, He represented the CS, Prof, Judi Wakhungu during the global side event on Soda Lake Projects at the on-going COP 13

The Director, MEAs, Mr. Richard Mwendandu during the COP 13 on CBD in Cancun, Mexico, He represented the CS, Prof, Judi Wakhungu during the global side event on Soda Lake Projects at the on-going COP 13

The 2030 Agenda for sustainable development sets forth an ambitious set of universal goals and targets to tackle the challenges facing the world today, Cabinet Secretary in the Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources, Prof. Judi Wakhungu has said.

In a presentation made on her behalf by the Director of Multilateral Environmental Agreements (MEAs), Mr. Richard Mwendandu, during a Side event hosted by United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) with the collaboration of the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), the ABS Capacity Development Initiative, the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), during the 13th Conference of Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity {COP 13}in Cancun, Mexico, that sought to examine the contribution of projects that use genetic resources to implement the sustainable development goals, Prof. Wakhungu noted that, In order to ensure that its visionary outcomes are achieved, it is imperative that, efforts to implement the 2030 Agenda are made in a way that effectively integrates the economic, social and environmental dimensions, including the role of genetic resources.

The Kenyan delegation at the COP13 in Cancun, Mexico

The Kenyan delegation at the COP13 in Cancun, Mexico

Noting that the Nagoya Protocol is uniquely positioned to facilitate this integration through science, technology, the sustainable management of natural resources and traditional knowledge, Prof. Wakhungu enumerated the lessons learnt and noted that, Education and awareness among the providers and users in all the parties is key on implementation of the Nagoya Protocol; Development of effective legislations, policies and institutional arrangements with clear and certainty framework will attract investments in biodiversity based business and promote conservation and livelihoods; Capacity building on development  is quite critical for compliance and enforcement, specifically on access, ownership, IP clauses, applicable laws, third party involvement and disbursement; Vested interests, dealing with non parties ,inadequate compliance mechanism between parties and emerging issues such as synthetic biology affect delivery of the third objective of CBD and  Nagoya Protocol; Grant of Prior Informed Consent (PIC) with involvement of communities can be complicated due to lack of effective legal structures within the community which could be used in Access Benefit Sharing (ABS) negotiations; and that, dealing with industrial partners can be a challenge especially if the idea is not driven by companies from non party states, as that can  be complex and present uncertainty on accessed genetic resources due to the common phenomenon of company mergers and acquisitions.

Delegates from different couintries of the World following keenly during the on-going COP 13 in Cancun, Mexico

Delegates from different couintries of the World following keenly during the on-going COP 13 in Cancun, Mexico

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5.12.2016.

Mexican-president-enrique-peria-nieto-opening-cop-13-in-cancun-mexico

Mexican-president-Enrique-Peria-Nieto-opening-cop-13-in-cancun-mexico

Nations have been challenged to change their way of life to stop the loss of Biodiversity, which threatens to permanently change the course of human live.

President Enrique Peria Nieto of Mexico noted that Biodiversity was the cornerstone of human existence on earth and it was important to conserve it for their own survival.

He was addressing over 10,000 delegates from 196 Countries during the opening ceremony of the 13th Conference on Biological Diversity {COP 13} at the Moon Palace Convention Centre in Cancun, Mexico.

The Principal Secretary in the State Department of Environment, Mr. Charles Sunkuli, leads Kenya’s delegation to the Conference.

The Convention on Biological Diversity Signed by 150 heads of State and government at the 1992 Rio Earth Summit is dedicated to promoting sustainable development.

It recognizes that, biological diversity is about more than just plants, animals and microorganisms and their ecosystems. It is about people and their need for food security, medicines, fresh air and water, shelter, and a clean and healthy environment.

Biodiversity is the life support system of the planet, as human beings depend on it for the air they breathe, food and water. Wetlands filter pollutants from water, trees and plants reduce global warming by absorbing carbon.

At the same time, bacteria and fungi break down organic material and fertilize the soil.

 It has been empirically proved that, native species richness is linked to the health of ecosystems, as is the quality of life for humans.

delegates-following-the-official-opening-ceremony-of-cop-13-in-cancun-mexico

delegates-following-the-official-opening-ceremony-of-cop-13-in-cancun-mexico

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GREEN WORLD AWARDS

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